• SWICH

    Ethnography, Museums of World Culture and New Citizenship in Europe.

    Sharing a World of Inclusion, Creativity and Heritage.

  • “What did you bring with you?”

    The project “What did you bring with you?” was part of the EU-project “Read Me II”.

    Duration: March 2011 until September 2012.

  • Mongolian Ethnographica of the Austrian Collector Hans Leder at Museums across Europe

    forMuse

    Ein Förderprogramm forMuse - Forschung an Museen
    Projektleitung: Dr. Maria-Katharina Lang

  • Mongolian Ethnographica of the Austrian Collector Hans Leder at Museums across Europe

    forMuse – reasearch at museums

    forMuse – reasearch at museums

    A program funded by the Federal Ministry of Science and Research (BMWF).www.formuse.at

    Thanks to the support of the BMWF, this program is able to be conducted by an international project team for a period of three years in a close cooperation between the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Museum of Ethnology Vienna.

    Project head: Maria-Katharina Lang
    Research Team: Mag. Stefan Bauer (Museum für Völkerkunde Wien)
    Prof. Dr. Ágnes Birtalan (Eötvös Loránd University Budapest)
    Dr. Olaf Czaja (Universität Leipzig)
    Dr. Béla Kelény (Ferenc Hopp Museum Budapest)
    Lhagvademchig Jadamba, PhD. cand.(National University of Mongolia)
    Dr. Christian Schicklgruber (Museum für Völkerkunde Wien)

    The most extensive collection of Mongolian ethnographica goes back to the Austrian explorer Hans Leder (1848-1921).

    In 1892, Leder stayed in southern Siberia in order to discover rare types of insects by assignment of the Russian Grand Duke Nikolai M. Romanow. His entomological interests then led him southward from there, to Mongolia. During further ventures between 1892 and 1905, Leder predominantly took to collecting and studying Mongolian-Buddhist items.

    A part of said collection, 813 objects, are held by the Museum of Ethnology Vienna. Further parts of the collection are retained by the Néprajzi Múzeum in Budapest, Náprstek Museum in Prague, the Museum of Ethnology of the J. & E. von Portheim Foundation in Heidelberg, the Linden Museum in Stuttgart, the Grassi Museum in Leipzig, as well as by the Museum of Ethnology Hamburg. All in all, there are about 4500 artefacts.

    The collection is unique as it represents a snapshot of everyday culture in northern Mongolia at the turn of the 19th century. This part of Mongolian culture was increasingly repressed and mostly destroyed in the late 1930s. Objects were destroyed or had lost their purpose due to the fact that the complex ritual life of which the items were an integral part had been prohibited in a radical manner. Through the introduction of democracy starting in 1990 and the reintroduction of Buddhism, these objects have become essential.

    In the course of this project, the various parts of the collection will be recorded, analyzed in detail, catalogued by object groups and combined in one comprehensive viewing for the first time. The consolidation of the individual parts of the collection and researching the archived material available provide a glimpse of the entire collection, the process of collecting, as well as on the personality of Hans Leder, the collector. Through the recording of the data an overview of the Leder collections will be created, which will serve as a basis for a virtual, and later, an actual exhibit.

    One essential aspect of the project is to process the documentation of the collection together with Mongolian colleagues and to make it available in Mongolia.
    Field studies in the course of the project intend to contrast the locations and monasteries described by the collector and to conduct interviews regarding the history of sacred objects and locations along the historic route of the journey.

    Cooperating Institutions: GRASSI Museum für Völkerkunde, Leipzig
    Linden-Museum, Staatliches Museum für Völkerkunde, Stuttgart
    Naturhistorisches Museum, Wien
    Náprstek Museum, Prag
    Néprajzi Múzeum Budapest
    Völkerkundemuseum der J.& E. von Portheim Stiftung, Heidelberg
    Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE), Department of Inner Asian Studies, Budapest
    National University of Mongolia/ Department for Social Anthropology
    Artex Art Services

  • Mongolian Ethnographica of the Austrian Collector Hans Leder at Museums across Europe

    forMuse – research at museums

    A program funded by the Federal Ministry of Science and Research (BMWF).
    Project head: Dr. Maria-Katharina Lang (Institute for Social Anthropology, AAS/ MVK)

  • Sharing cultural memory

    Historical ethnographical collections of the Weltmuseum Wien

    Ein Förderprogramm forMuse - Forschung an Museen
    Projektleitung: Dr. habil. Jani Kuhnt-Saptodewo

  • Sharing cultural memory

    Historical ethnographical collections of the Weltmuseum Wien

    Ein Förderprogramm forMuse - Forschung an Museen
    Projektleitung: Dr. habil. Jani Kuhnt-Saptodewo

  • Material Culture and Cultural Memory

    Projektleitung: Dr. Claudia Augustat

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Information

Weltmuseum Wien
Neue Burg
Heldenplatz, 1010 Wien
Tel. +43 1 534 30 – 5052 oder 5053
info@weltmuseumwien.at